10 Things You Didn't Know About Inward Singing

Some of you curious types have asked to read my dissertation on inward singing, and you definitely will be able to in the near future, but for now I've created a quick list of important facts: 1. REVERSE FLOW: Inward singing uses reverse airflow, so that you’re literally inhaling while you sing. (ok, maybe you knew that…) 2. GLOBAL: Inward speech is found on every continent. 3. OLD MUSIC: Inward singing is found in many traditional styles of singing through the world, including North America (check out 3:30). 4. NEW MUSIC: Many living composers have used inward singing in their music, including Helmut Lachenmann, Georges Aperghis, Joan la Barbara, Sir Peter Maxwell Davies, Meredith Monk, Nicholas Demaison, Michael Baldwin, Jamie Leigh Sampson, Christopher Chandler, and so many more… 5. NOTATION: The most common form of notation for inward singing is up-bow for inward (˅) and down-bow for a return to outward (Π). 6. MUSCLES: Inward singing uses the vocal muscles in a very different way, so it can be quite tiring. The body thinks you’re trying to breath, so it naturally pulls your vocal folds apart. Therefore, when we sing inwardly we’re completely resisting our body’s normal tendency (sorry, body!) 7. PITCH: We naturally sing higher during inward singing. Try it! 8. RESONANCE: The spectral analysis of inward singing shows that the voice is resonating in a different way, and much less, as compared to outward singing. 9. CIRCULAR SINGING: One time, Joan la Barbara alternated between inward singing and outward singing continuously for 8 minutes. I’d like to see Kenny G do that... 10. TENACIOUS D: Jack Black also alternated between inward and outward singing, but Joan still has him beat. - posted by AmandaSome of you curious types have asked to read my dissertation on inward singing, and you definitely will be able to in the near future, but for now I've created a quick list of important facts: 1. REVERSE FLOW: Inward singing uses reverse airflow, so that you’re literally inhaling while you sing. (ok, maybe you knew that…) 2. GLOBAL: Inward speech is found on every continent. 3. OLD MUSIC: Inward singing is found in many traditional styles of singing through the world, including North America (check out 3:30). 4. NEW MUSIC: Many living composers have used inward singing in their music, including Helmut Lachenmann, Georges Aperghis, Joan la Barbara, Sir Peter Maxwell Davies, Meredith Monk, Nicholas Demaison, Michael Baldwin, Jamie Leigh Sampson, Christopher Chandler, and so many more… 5. NOTATION: The most common form of notation for inward singing is up-bow for inward (˅) and down-bow for a return to outward (Π). 6. MUSCLES: Inward singing uses the vocal muscles in a very different way, so it can be quite tiring. The body thinks you’re trying to breath, so it naturally pulls your vocal folds apart. Therefore, when we sing inwardly we’re completely resisting our body’s normal tendency (sorry, body!) 7. PITCH: We naturally sing higher during inward singing. Try it! 8. RESONANCE: The spectral analysis of inward singing shows that the voice is resonating in a different way, and much less, as compared to outward singing. 9. CIRCULAR SINGING: One time, Joan la Barbara alternated between inward singing and outward singing continuously for 8 minutes. I’d like to see Kenny G do that... 10. TENACIOUS D: Jack Black also alternated between inward and outward singing, but Joan still has him beat. - posted by Amanda

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