COMMISSIONING FUND FOR NEW MUSIC

 

Help us grow the repertoire for

women and treble vocal ensembles

 

When Quince Ensemble formed in 2009, we struggled to find enough music for our 4-woman ensemble fill an entire program. Determined to put down roots in the chamber music world, we immediately began commissioning and building our own repertoire from the ground up, repertoire that is empowering, surprising, and relevant. This repertoire is steadily making its way into the standard repertoire for vocal chamber music and inspiring the next generation of composers and singers. 

 

It has been thrilling to watch the music we've commissioned grow beyond our ensemble, from workshops with the University of Toledo and Connecticut College Choirs, side-by-side performances with students at the Walden School and Omaha Area High Schools, to performances by professional ensembles throughout the world.

 

And our most ambitious projects are still taking root. We’re celebrating our 10th season by raising $10,000 and launching our official Quince Blossoms Commissioning Fund for New Music. This fund will be an ongoing "seed fund" that will increase our impact and create an enduring legacy in the vocal music lineage.

 

 

 

 

 

 

GIVING LEVELS

 

 

$1-100 Seeds

Your gift is the start of something big to come! 

 

$101-250 Roots

Help us put down roots in the legacy of vocal music repertoire. 

 

$251-500 Branches

Be part of our growth! Help us branch out with bold new repertoire 

that will shape the future of vocal chamber music. 

 

$501-1,000+ Blossoms

Every bloom needs a little sunshine to flourish! Send some light our 

way and help us spread beauty in the world. 

 

 

Here's a sample from one of our recent commissions, "Aún" by Dave Reminick!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

UPCOMING COMMISSIONS

 

 

Annie Hui-Hsin Hsieh, composer

A new chamber opera titled "Proximal Encounters" for four female voices and live electronics, of one hour in duration. The physical interactions betweenthe performers will be sonified through the use of wearable devices that assemble portable speakers and microphones into a composite unit. The voices will be accompanied by a chorus of acoustic feedback triggered by the devices worn on their arms, torsos andlegs, as they move and adjust their choreographed bodily distance with one another throughout the performance. This chorus will be controlled and manipulated live through electronic means, constructing a malleable, organic and interactive counterpart to the voices. 

Gilda Lyons, composer-vocalist 

“a bright flame before me” runs toward the urgent, evolving, and deeply personal question of identity, and reflects with intention on the layered meaning of ‘home.’  Tracing a through-line between contemporary found texts and ancient hymns, prayers, and incantations, all interwoven with wordless, abstract, vocal sound-snapshots, this extended work for women’s vocal quartet exists in multiple worlds both textually and musically—dovetailing lyric, bel canto, and melodically-driven writing, with close harmonies, abstracted gestures, fragmented lines, body percussion, and extended technique. Commenting on extreme societal shifts, and on the shared and polarized experience of the stranger, the insider, and the other, I wrestle with my own cultural disconnect, pride, disorientation, and identity; I am a first-generation US Citizen on my mother’s side, working as composer/vocalist and raising two sons to know and love both their US home and their home in Nicaragua. “a bright flame before me” pushes against and engages in dialog with the boundaries between concert music and theater, drawing on the uniquely modern gifts of the vocal ensemble Quince. Through an exploration of the widest range of vocal possibility, “a bright flame before me” leans into the intimate space inhabited by honest and direct communication through vocal sound.  

Paul Pinto, composer-vocalist

"I'm writing an episodic magical-realist love story for and about the women of Quince, told though very quick chanting, virtuosic flourishes, thoughtful stares, lampshades, video and electronics. I don't know how long it's going to be. In fact, I don't know if it'll ever end. Maybe I'll just keep writing episodes until it gets picked up by Netflix or until I die. It begins with the four characters meeting a mysterious sailor at the Hoyt-Schermerhorn subway station and following her on a quixotic meandering of subterranean New York, discovering love (of the sailor, of themselves, of each other, of New York, of humanity in general) told in tightgrittysexysilly four-part harmony."

Annika Socolofsky, composer-vocalist 

"Quince is such a versatile ensemble and I cannot wait to ask for the kitchen sink from them. My obsessions with vocal timbre and inflection are about to go off the deep end in what I can only describe as a spectral Dolly Parton scores a queer 'Love Actually' (Liam Neeson not invited). The piece will be about 10 – 15 minutes long and will be made up of several shorter movements each exploring different corners of Country queen Dolly’s vocal timbre and poignant storytelling prowess."

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